Media for The Biology of Desire

Publishers Weekly

"Even when presenting more technical information, Lewis shows a keen ability to put a human face on the most groundbreaking research into addiction. Likewise, he manages to make complex findings and theories both comprehensible and interesting."

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The Daily Beast

"What gives Lewis an edge are his impeccable, Oliver Sacks-like case studies sprinkled throughout the book, which demonstrate his understanding of and fascination with the experience of drug users."

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Salon

"Lewis’s argument is actually fairly simple: The disease theory, and the science sometimes used to support it, fail to take into account the plasticity of the human brain."

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Kirkus Reviews

"An intellectually authoritative yet controversial declaration that substance and behavioral dependencies are swiftly and deeply learned via the “neural circuitry of desire.”"

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The Wall Street Journal

"As Mr. Lewis stresses throughout this unorthodox but enlightening book, people learn to be addicts, and, with effort, they can learn not to be addicts, too."

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Sydney Morning Herald

"The Biology of Desire is a very readable, often touching, gateway into the universe of neuroscience and the shadowland of addiction."

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Media for Memoirs of an Addicted Brain

Publishers Weekly

“Meticulous, evocative… Lewis’s unusual blend of scientific expertise, street cred, vivid subjectivity and searching introspection yields a compelling perspective on the perils and allure of addiction.”

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The Guardian

"This memoir is as strange, immediate and artfully written as any Oliver Sacks case-study, with the added scintillation of having been composed by its subject."

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The Independent

"And the picture of his brain activity with which Lewis furnishes us is at just the right resolution for an interested lay reader. He patiently guides along the bidirectional neural pathways that explain how an addict gets caught in a feedback loop of anticipatory craving."

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The Fix

"Memoirs of an Addicted Brain may be the most original and illuminating addiction memoir since Thomas De Quincey's seminal Confessions of an Opium Eater."

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